Last edited by Akinotilar
Sunday, February 9, 2020 | History

8 edition of Memoirs of an Arabian princess from Zanzibar found in the catalog.

Memoirs of an Arabian princess from Zanzibar

  • 46 Want to read
  • 16 Currently reading

Published by M. Wiener Pub. in New York .
Written in English

    Places:
  • Zanzibar,
  • Tanzania
    • Subjects:
    • Ruete, Emilie, 1844-1924.,
    • Princesses -- Tanzania -- Zanzibar -- Biography.,
    • Zanzibar -- History -- To 1890.

    • Edition Notes

      Statementby Emily Ruete (born Salme, princess of Oman and Zanzibar) ; with a new introduction by Patricia W. Romero.
      Classifications
      LC ClassificationsDT449.Z274 R83713 1989
      The Physical Object
      Paginationxxii, 298 p. ;
      Number of Pages298
      ID Numbers
      Open LibraryOL2190633M
      ISBN 101558760075, 1558760113
      LC Control Number89009064

      I am glad that she had some financial hardships that forced her to write such a book to sell it. Like them she learned to read, an accomplishment which distinguished her above the other women in her position, who usually came when they were at least sixteen or eighteen, and by that time of course had no ambition to sit with little tots on a hard schoolroom mat. Then why should an Arabian mother, whose demands for herself and child are so small, work as hard as a German housewife? My sister Shewane acted as ringleader; she gave us a significant glance of which we, all kindred spirits, were not slow to catch the meaning. By Maralyn Rittenour on Jan 09, An amazing first person account of life as a Sultan's favorite daughter during the heyday of Arab superiority in Africa while the slave trade was booming.

      Empires of the Monsoon Richard Hall Until Vasco da Gama discovered the sea-route to the East in almost nothing was known in the West of the exotic cultures and wealth of the Indian Ocean and its peoples. Well do I remember the enchanting scene. From four o'clock in the morning until twelve at night there was constant movement; the stream of people coming and leaving never ceased. The remainder would read stories, visit sick or well friends in their rooms, or attend to other private affairs. No less populous, in fact, was my father's town palace, called Bet il Sahel, or Shore House. My sister Chole was delighted, as we now were almost under her very roof; she in fact secured and arranged our new quarters for us.

      The remainder would read stories, visit sick or well friends in their rooms, or attend to other private affairs. Luxury plays the same part everywhere. In this insider's story, a sultan's daughter who fled her gilded cage offers a compelling look at nineteenth-century Arabic and African royal life. Between half past nine and ten my elder brothers left their apartments to take breakfast with my father, in which repast not a single secondary wife, however great a favourite with the Sultan, was allowed to share.


Share this book
You might also like
description of high-occupancy vehicle facilities in North America

description of high-occupancy vehicle facilities in North America

Psychophysical Comparisons in Image Compression Algorithms

Psychophysical Comparisons in Image Compression Algorithms

Seven Wilson.

Seven Wilson.

handbook of the law of evidence for North Carolina

handbook of the law of evidence for North Carolina

Illinois School Law Survey

Illinois School Law Survey

What pleasures

What pleasures

Soap story

Soap story

The flood girls

The flood girls

Thomas Chandler Haliburton

Thomas Chandler Haliburton

glossary of woodworking terms

glossary of woodworking terms

Christianity and international peace.

Christianity and international peace.

Outlines of lectures

Outlines of lectures

Memoirs of an Arabian princess from Zanzibar book

No one would think of disturbing a Mahometan at prayer under any circumstances, no, not even if the house should take fire. In Zanzibar we wash every day whatever needs washing, and in half an hour's time the things are all dry, pressed not ironedand put away.

Memoirs Arabian Princess

His principal wife, Azze bint Sef, of the royal house of Oman, held absolute sway in his home. I had no time to spare, and did not even want to wait for a horse to be saddled. Hence the phrase "I feel a draught" is unknown in that country. But in order to be familiar with the details of their daily life one must have spent some time among them.

If the law prohibits, in general, a woman from holding personal intercourse of any sort with a strange man, it makes two exceptions, in favour of the sovereign and of the judge.

Well-written, easy read. Of course this rather exacting rule is obeyed only by the extremely pious. Nor did I neglect horsemanship; Mesrur, a eunuch, was ordered by Majid to continue the instruction he had begun.

Only spices were measured by the pound. Under such circumstances it was natural enough if ridiculous race hatreds manifested themselves among the children.

European ladies who may actually have penetrated into a harem, perhaps in Constantinople or in Cairo, are still unacquainted with the real harem; they have only known its outer semblance in the rooms kept for show, rooms where European finery is partially aped.

Children of all ages tore about, squabbled, and fought; shouting and clapping of hands — taking the place of the Western bell-ringing — for servants, resounded incessantly; the enormous, thick, wooden sandals of the women, sometimes inlaid with silver or gold, made a distressing clatter.

Three playmates I particularly regretted leaving, two of my sisters and one of my brothers, almost exactly my age. But my mother was in her element.

Our object was therefore attained. An Arab does not care what he spends in adorning his niches; let a handsomely painted plate or a tasteful vase or a delicately cut glass cost what it may, if it looks well he buys it.

Our own room was of fair size, and from it was visible a neighbouring mosque. She also alludes to the racial tension between some of the Sultan's wives. Majid and his friends remained in the anteroom, not being allowed to come up until Chaduji sent permission by my mother's request.

Now, as thousands and thousands are totally ignorant of penmanship, and therefore cannot make their petitions in writing, nothing remains for such needy ones but to come themselves, even if they have to undertake the little journey from Asia to Africa.

Memoirs of an Arabian Princess from Zanzibar

The Arab has no leaning toward commerce and industry; he cares for little else than warfare and agriculture. Her marriage to Majid entitled Assha to first place in the household; nevertheless, Chaduji patronised her so that the poor, gentle soul would go weeping to my mother, to complain of this unwarranted treatment.

Near by nurses sunned themselves and their little charges, whom they were regaling with fairy tales and stories. A runner must be able to cover a lot of ground in a day, but he is unusually well-treated and cared for; on his discretion and integrity — since he is intrusted with the most confidential matters — the welfare, or more, of his owners may depend.

One of the most famous records of life in 19th-century Zanzibar, Memoirs of an Arabian Princess from Zanzibar was written by a woman called Emily Ruete.

As Romero Life Histories of African Women explains, she was born in as Salme, princess of Oman and Zanzibar, and grew up privy to the machinations of her father's harem and of her scores of siblings.

The groom who bore the welcome news received a fine present from his overjoyed master. Although she was born and brought up in Zanzibar, Salamah bint Said was eventually forced to leave the islands.Memoirs of an Arabian Princess from Zanzibar.

By Emily Ruete Memoirs of an Arabian Princess from Zanzibar By Emily Ruete Return to an era when Zanzibar was ruled by sultans, and enter a vanished world of harems, slave trading, and court intrigues.

In this insider's story, a sultan's daughter who fled her gilded cage offers a compelling. Sep 16,  · Book digitized by Google and uploaded to the Internet Archive by user tpb. Skip to main content. This banner text Memoirs of an Arabian Princess by Emilie Ruete, Lionel Strachey.

Publication date Digitizing sponsor Google Book from the collections of unknown library Language English. Book digitized by Google and uploaded to the Internet. Aug 05,  · Zanzibar: memoirs of an Arabian princess Weekly reader Angela MacKay visits a palace built in and discovers the story of Sayyida Salme, daughter of Sultan Said of Zanzibar Author: Angela Mackay.

hildebrandsguld.com: Memoirs of an Arabian Princess from Zanzibar () by Ruete Sayyida Prin. Of Zanzibar, Emily and a great selection of similar /5(K). Get this from a library!

Memoirs of an Arabian princess from Zanzibar: an autobiography. [Emilie Ruete]. She wrote Memoirs of an Arabian Princess from Zanzibar in German in It was the first known autobiography of an Arabian woman. She died in in Germany at the age of This edition was translated by Lionel Strachey and published in Strachey died in Reviews:

Follow the Author